SCOTT MANLEY HADLEY

alberta 

 

We stay for a night 

In the luxury farmhouse 

Owned by the parents  

Of my lover's  

Cousin's 

Wife. 

 

It is familiar terrain for me. 

 

My ex’s parents, too, 

Were 

An unhappy 

Moneyed 

Married 

Couple  

Resenting the other  

For their life lived 

In the middle of fucking nowhere. 

 

The wife 

Shares a name with my mother  

And is pissed off from the start 

That her son-in-law 

Has last-minute-invited 

His eldest cousin 

And her bald English boyfriend. 

 

Her husband, Jim, 

Seems ecstatic that we are there  

Some strange youngish people 

To play and flirt and talk to. 

 

We play a strange board game  

That involves Jim and I 

Holding hands for twenty minutes. 

 

He tells many anecdotes 

All of which are set in places 

Far away from the nowhere 

Where he lives. 

 

He tells us this land is his historic 

Family farm 

Though he is not a farmer. 

 

He tells me he is 

"In the sciences" 

But does not elaborate 

And I do not push. 

 

He is drinking heavily 

Using our presence  

As an excuse 

Because 

His daughters  

(Like their mother) 

Do not encourage him 

To open bottles  

And his son-in-law  

Does not drink. 

 

At nine o'clock  

The woman who shares a name with my mother 

Is ready for bed. 

 

She wears a thick white dressing gown 

And pointedly yawns 

While Jim opens 

Another bottle. 

 

Towards the end of the evening  

(Just before 

His wife orders him to stop 

Drinking and talking and drinking  

And go 

To bed) 

He tells us 

A bit of local folklore. 

 

A friend of his 

In the area 

Is working on a macabre project 

Making ready 

To be wall-mounted 

A pair of interlocked 

Stag skulls. 

 

As I'm sure you're aware, 

Jim slurs, 

When it's rutting season  

(he draws out these words like he’s Rupert Campbell-Black) 

Stags like to fight. 

 

Sometimes, 

He continues, 

Their antlers get stuck together. 

 

Usually  

When this happens  

They keep fighting 

Until an antler snaps 

Or they both  

Die 

Together. 

 

That is what happened, 

He points, 

In that field over there. 

 

When his friend has finished 

Bleaching and preserving 

And mounting the heads, 

Jim says he will buy them  

And display them in his home. 

 

Just  

I want to say 

Get a divorce, mate. 

 

Later, 

My lover and I fuck 

In the spare bedroom 

One floor beneath 

Jim’s bed. 

 

I know 

While it's happening  

That if Jim hasn't passed out 

He will be listening. 

 

Tbf  

I think  

He's probably passed out. 

skunks 

 

Last night, homewards,  

I cycle past two skunks  

Grazing, together, under a tree.  

 

This morning, workwards,  

I cycle past the same tree and in the road,  

beside the tree,  

Is a dead, squashed skunk.  

 

Tonight, homewards,  

The dead skunk is gone  

But, alone, snuffling, is a living skunk, alone, under the tree.  

 

I stop 

And I cry 

Because I too often 

Choose to be 

Alone.

Scott Manley Hadley (@Scott_Hadley) is a Toronto-based writer who was ‘Highly Commended’ in the Forward Prizes for Poetry 2019. Their publications include Bad Boy Poet (Open Pen, 2018), My Father, From A Distance (Selcouth Station Press, 2019) and the pleasure of regret (Broken Sleep Books, 2020). Scott has been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and blogs (about mental health and literature) at TriumphoftheNow.com

deathcap is Coven Editions' online literary mag featuring a curated collection of poetry, fiction and community pieces.  Review our Submissions Guidelines for more information if you are interested in contributing to deathcap.

© 2020 Coven Editions

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram